FlowArt Extension Line With 0.2 Micron Baby Filter

$5.90
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FlowArt Extension Line With 0,2 Micron Baby Filter - 100 / Box

FlowArt® is a 0.2 micron baby filter set is used to filter air, particles, bacteria, fungus and fungus spores during IV infusions.

Quantity: 100 / Box

Product Code: FLO-F6002B

Priming Volume: 0.45mL

Length: 11cm

** Photoprotective version available upon request - Please use the Contact page to discuss further. 

Instructions:

  • Prime the FlowArt® Filter set with saline. Hold the filter in vertical position with the flow arrow (on the two sides of the filter) upwards. Discard the air trapped in the set.
  • Connect the male luer of FlowArt® Filter set to female luer of I.V. cannula or catheter hub.
  • Flush the I.V. cannula or catheter after each fluid intervention per facility protocol.

FlowArt® Filter set is suitable for:

  • Oncology
  • MRI procedures

FlowArt® 0.2 Micron Baby Filter set is NOT suitable for:

  • Lipid solution
  • TPN filtration
  • Blood transfusion

DO NOT use filter for longer than 96 hours. 

    Research:

    The prevalence of reported Needle Stick Injuries (NSIs) in Australia per year was estimated to be 18,000 in Australian hospitals alone before the introduction of Safety Engineered Devices (SEDs) [1-2]. Considering this number is only the reported incidences and underreporting in Australian hospitals is estimated to be 40%, [3] this is a significant hindrance in maintaining a safe work environment. There are a number of diseases that can be transmitted through NSI, including the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B (HBV) and hepatitis C (HCV).  The use of SEDs has been shown to reduce NSIs by up to 31% during a 9-month implementation period. [4]

    1. Cathryn Murphy – (2008) , Improved surveillance and mandated use of sharps with engineered sharp injury protections: a national call to action
    2. The Australian Council on Healthcare Standards - (2012) Infection Control version 3.1. Retrospcetive data in full. Australasian Clinical Indicator Report: 2004—2011. In (13th ed.). Sydney NSW; ACHS.
    3. Australian Safety and Compensation Council – (2008) Occupational Exposures in Australian Nurses. Canberra: Australian Government.
    4. Goris, Ashleigh J., Gemeinhart, Nancy, and Babcock, Hilary M - (2015) “Reducing Needlestick Injuries from Active Safety Devices: A Passive Safety Engineered Device Conversion.” AJIC: American Journal of Infection Control 43.6

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